Dr. Lauren Schack Clark

Professor of Piano

Director of Keyboard Studies

Arkansas State UniversitY

870-680-8029  lsclark@astate.edu

Lauren Schack Clark has performed as a soloist and collaborative pianist throughout the US and Europe, and is Associate Professor of Piano and Director of Keyboard Studies at Arkansas State University.  Solo performances have included recitals in Naples, Italy, at Berklee College of Music, and at Dickinson College in Pennsylvania.  Her CD on Centaur Records contains piano music by Boston composer Dr. Rosey Lee.  She has also recorded on the Emeritus, Mark, and Vienna Modern Masters labels.  Her book, Keyboard Theory and Piano Technique, is published by Longbow Publishing.  She presented a lecture/recital with Marika Kyriakos, soprano, at the World Piano Conference and at the 2011 MTNA National Conference.  Dr. Clark has performed at the International Double Reed, Tuba/Euphonium, and Trumpet Guild Conferences.  She has played with principle players of orchestras such as the Boston Symphony, St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, Scottish National Orchestra, Slovenian Radio Symphony, and Cincinnati Orchestra, and with faculty members of the Vienna Conservatory, Eastman School of Music, New England Conservatory, and the University of Michigan, among others.  She has concertized in Paris at the Institute for Advanced Vocal Study and French Piano Institute, and at Cork School of Music, Ireland. 

She has been voted Teacher of the Year by the Arkansas State MTA, and Barney Smith Professor of the Year by the ASU Student Government Association.  Her students have won first prizes in many local and regional competitions.  She is the Immediate Past President of the Arkansas State MTA, and is the MTNA South Central Division Competitions Chair.  She holds a DMA in from Boston University, a Master's from Northwestern, a Graduate Diploma from the Longy School of Music, and a Bachelor’s from the Hartt School of Music.  Her principle teachers were Raymond Hanson, Eda Mazo-Shlyam, Deborah Sobol, and Thomas Stumpf.